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Projects
Thanks to Marcin Ignac for pointing out that the below project grid is not working properly on OS X Safari. The long horizontal line of items is not intended ;). Please use another browser to view this until i get it fixed in the next 1-2 days. Happy Holidays!
Bandwidth

Watch on Vimeo.

This synaesthetic, interactive musical experience provides six original modes in which the player may produce music. Kick off your shoes and get lost in a world of delicious sounding abstract geometry.

INSTRUCTIONS
Turn up your sound volume.
Click and drag to explore.
Press bubbles to change scenes.
Press Escape to quit.

Android and iOS versions coming soon.

Advanced configuration is possible by editing the contents of the bundled settings.yml. By changing the values of that file, you can control the window properties, startup behavior, user interface detail, and OSC network parameters. When set up on multiple machines, Bandwidth's 'grid' mode will broadcast OSC messages and most other modes will recieve.

Made possible by The Public. UK

Special Thanks:

The OpenFrameworks project,
Graham Peet
Joss Widdowson
Rebecca Shostak
the oooShiny group
Sandwell Arts Trust
Fran McHugh


Creative Commons License
Bandwidth by Josh Nimoy is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

textflasher

Marc Nimoy Extraordinaire was redoing the website for the UCLA Center for Intercultural Performance (CIP) and he had embedded a small animated gif that had a marquee of text announces and fun blur transitioning. I offered to redo it in Flash 8, and give him a lot of customization features on the html side so the thing could be dynamically driven and lower bandwidth. After pulling a happy all-nighter at Beit T'Shuvah, TextFlasher was born. Thank goodness for cool flash filters. Although I know and love as3, I chose flash 8 because at the time I write this, that's installed by 98.9% of internet users. If you look in the example files, you'll see a large associative array of values and heavy commenting.

www.hci-fun.org.uk

I redid the website for the human computer interaction organisation in Liverpool England that was commissioning me to do a couple pieces at FACT. I used an open source flavour of flash - mtasc and swfmill with a lot of xml and a makefile. The source was made available on the site. We used the blog engine, b2evolution, to manage the content, and the flash file just pulled the content from the mysql database and presented it this multi-windowed way. Now that I look back on it, Drupal would probably have been more appropriate. The user interface was a bunch of UIComponent windows that popped up inside the browser. Small green indicators and trails were used to point out where the user had clicked and dragged the mouse in an artistic overlay. I subclassed the window component to add a resize control at the bottom right corner.

picky

An open source Java desktop application for authoring PIC chip firmware in a restricted form of Java. I got to know Eclipse pretty well during this time, and had a lot of fun seeing the application look native even if it was cross platform. I discovered how little programming one needs to do with all the wonderful libraries that are available.

Motion Paintings Software

Watch on Vimeo.

MotionPaintings was a system I built in collaboration with artist, Rebecca Allen, based on the terrain mapping from her emmersive environment, Emergence. It allows her to easily create a looping keyed path of 3D cameras, intended for motion-tweening at the speed of growing plants. The idea of the piece is that this painting on the wall will change so slowly that a viewer must come back in an hour to see any noticable visual change. The beautiful mountainous terrain becomes a semi-still painting, admired as an abstract scene of blurring colors. Additionally, I aimed to bring the Emergence software to a level in which the system could be installed on a computer by one non-technical person, in one minute - instead of a crew of programmers over several weeks. This software is currently unavailable for download.

Concept by Rebecca Allen. The beautiful mountainous terrain built by Gino Ok, Pete Conolly, Damon Seeley, and Daniel Shiplacoff. User interface design and data-cleaning by Josh Nimoy.

Screenshot and Video

big video

small video

JTNGSE

JTNGSE was a graphics editing program that was half GUI, half scripting. I originally wrote it for undergraduate friends in the UCLA design department because I was sad to hear that John Maeda's awesome Design by Numbers "did not save" or "did not support color." I also saw that Processing was wonderful, but also discouraging for my peers to learn (at that time, they considered it too complicated). Basically, everyone seems to need something that integrates in a very obvious way with their software packages. This lack of easy integration is what my friends claim is holding them back from beginning to learn this sort of process. JTNGSE was one attempt. Since that time, I have come to believe that the problem is a bit more complex.

Special Thanks to Debrah Isaac for using it in her senior project, Gabe Dunne for testing.

forum.design

I quickly built this newsgroup/messageboard as an effort to give my fellow design students a place to voice their opinions in a truly informal, yet public setting. People have been using it for years. The site has needed minimal maintenance, and allows the design students to change colors, images, and titles as they please, without a password. The site provided a nice communication ground while there was a winter in the student group efforts in our department. The construction of this site predates the widespread popularity of reusable forums.

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