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Projects
Teaching Openframeworks

Video guiding the Processing coder through the mental transformation needed to start using OpenFrameworks to create equivalent work. This class was taught with Syed Reza Ali. We will post more episodes every time we teach this GAFFTA class. So far, I have shaved my face with a straight razor, did a claymation about pointers, and took apart a McDonalds cheeseburger. I hope it makes learning programming and its dry concepts a bit wetter. Special thanks to oooShiny for advising on the materials and teaching approach.

Sky Paintings

I produced this series of code-paintings during my early recovery. They are about sublime serendipity, and the universality of biological syntax. Each render takes about as long as a human would need to actually paint the same thing. Many fractal scenes were generated, but only a few were hand-picked for final presentation. These 2400 DPI prints, coded in Java/Processing, implement an iterative function. The slowly shifting transforms result in paint-strokes. On exhibition and for sale in the "Art by Code" show, at the Public Works, Roll Up Gallery at 161 Erie St., San Francisco. Additional prints of various sizes are also available directly from the artist.

Sky #6 installed at Roll Up Gallery next to beautiful shader works by Inigo Quilez

Sky #6 installed at Roll Up Gallery next to beautiful shader works by Inigo Quilez

Sky #6

Sky #6

Sky #7

Sky #7

Sky #9

Sky #9

Sky #10

Sky #10

Sky #13

Sky #13

Critical Path

I worked with an "indie" hollywood studio in collaboration with Jody Zellen in designing and building a web-based UI to present their interview videos of the top industry game designers on HTML5 canvas and video elements. I used ProcessingJS. The interface featured a line-network of tags shared between the videos. Each video was a sprite that had its own transformation matrix. Triangle collision was also employed in order to do mouse picking with non-rectangular 2D polygons. The javascript code was extremely object oriented, using static "class members" in addition to instance scoped members. The company, Artifact Studios, ran way over their revision allowance, and continued to expect work out of me long after the contract's duration had ended. And that was the last time I worked in Hollywood.

Nike 'One'

Motion Theory's workflow of the Nike 'One' commercials did not just benefit from an applet programmed by one of the team members. This time, the core workflow became a team of four visual programmers risking carpel tunnel to generate a diversity of floating engineering graphics using every trick in the book. Although the production process was organic and artistic, the team collaborated well - subclassing a common object oriented super class, using common (custom) rendering frameworks, establishing file format protocols for shared data, and using versioning systems. The result was complex yet delicate and tasteful swarm of diagrams and math floating around the heads of thinkers - interacting with the physical, emotional, and narrative surroundings. A demo applet was also published in Processing.org exhibitions. Processing Artists:

HP Pharrell

had the great honor of doing (more) algorithmic particle artistry with Motion Theory to produce this stunning new HP commercial, for their "The computer is personal again" campaign. Spinning spools of typographic smoke, shaking the pixels off shoes, and of course, a swarm of gratuitous abstract cool stuff -- these composite effects were animated primarily in Processing code with reinforcement C++ coding when needed. Thanks to Gabriel Dunne for doing some of the satellites. Unlike Nike 'One', this was quite a chromatic job. I have since gained a personal relationship with the colors magenta (FF00FF) and lime (00FF00). Special thanks to Mark Kudsi and Mathew Cullen, whose talents were absolutely essential to this wonderful project. This is what baby looks like.

Processing Tutorial for Flash/Lingo-ers

When I was a first year at ITP, I did a lot of social engineering in order to bring open source culture to attention. I also wished to support the efforts of some friends in another research program. I taught early releases of Processing to the students and faculty (and current faculty who were students then), and I also chose to use Processing to create a number of projects. My greatest propegandistic vessel was the "Proce55ing Workshop" (in 2002, two fives were being used in the name). My workshop was a precursor to the modern-day-ITP "drive-by seminar." I prepared a 3 hour performative coding demonstration, with a light discussion on open source. I designed my class hand-out to be not just a give-away, but something they might use more permanently. If GUI file viewing interfaces offer a user things like sort-by-date, sort-by -name, and sort-by-size, I was offering the community of Processing-incomers a reference that was sort-by-macromedia. We could reuse the knowledge the students already had and give them a fresh perspective on the debate of authorship and capitalism. By Fall Semester of 2004 (after I graduated), Processing was adopted by the NYU ITP Introduction to Computational Media course series as its primary teaching tool. My "tutorial for macromedia minds" has been translated to Japanese, and linked to by educators around the world. I am happy to have made some sort of contribution. Original Date: Saturday - Feb. 8, 2003 721 Broadway, Floor 4, Room 406 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm

BallDroppings

Balldroppings was one night of idle programming that blew up unexpectedly into a web phenomenon. I learned that simplicity is elegant, and C++ is wonderful for low-latency sound+image. I also learned about addiction and glucose metabolism rate highs. Although I do not accredit myself for having originated the idea of interactive lines with bouncing balls, there exists a small following in the online gaming community that gives me such credit, particularly when accusing one another of having copied me in their recent developments. BallDroppings has also been re-implemented in other languages by random people, referencing the name "BallDroppings." All this activity is very surprising to me. It is also a clear example of the great power resulting from refraining to mark intellectual property. A lot of people mistook BallDroppings to be my graduate thesis. I don't try to correct this misunderstanding.

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